Post Tagged with: "education"

Wilderness Therapy Programs Less Risky Than Daily Life

University of New Hampshire professor Michael Gass (left) and doctoral student Steve Javorski found that adolescents participating in adventure therapy programs are at significantly less risk of injury than those playing football and were three times less likely to visit the emergency room for an injury than if they were at home.

Adolescents participating in wilderness and adventure therapy programs are at significantly less risk of injury than those playing football and are three times less likely to visit the emergency room for an injury than if they were at home, a new study by University of New Hampshire researchers finds. These [...]

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Outdoor Education Helps Minority Students Close Gap in Environmental Literacy

Outdoor Education Helps Minority Students Close Gap in Environmental Literacy

Environmental education programs that took middle school students outdoors to learn helped minority students close a gap in environmental literacy, according to research from North Carolina State University. The study, published March 22 in PLOS ONE, showed that time outdoors seemed to impact African-American and Hispanic students more than Caucasian [...]

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College Graduation with Lower GPAs Linked to Parent’s Financial Aid

College Graduation with Lower GPAs Linked to Parent’s Financial Aid

1/16/2013 College students who aren’t studying hard may have their parents’ financial support to blame.

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ELLs Reading Programs: Quality of Instruction Trumps Language

1/15/2013 New research synthesizes studies of English reading outcomes for Spanish-dominant English language learners (ELLs) in elementary schools.

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“Success for All” Produces Uncertain Benefits after Grade 2

1/15/2013  Education researchers Paul Hanselman and Geoffrey D. Borman have evaluated the impact of literacy instruction in grades 3 through 5. Their findings were published in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis (EEPA) in Online First. EEPA is a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.

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Accepted memory formation model refuted

Accepted memory formation model refuted

1/3/2013  A study by Johns Hopkins researchers has shown that a widely accepted model of long-term memory formation — that it hinges on a single enzyme in the brain — is flawed.Related PostsDisappearing Bacterium May Protect Against Stroke Babies begin learning language from their mothers while in womb Electric stimulation [...]

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